IN OUR EXPERTS' OPINIONS

In Our Experts' Opinions: The Altep Blog

With more than 20 years' success in complex eDiscovery management, data forensics, compliance, and investigations, and a team of more than 200 experts throughout the US and in Europe, Altep offers a uniquely valuable perspective. Each month, our blog features a different expert, and offers analysis and commentary on a broad spectrum of topics from data management to cyber security. We hope you find our posts informative; if you'd like to submit a guest post, please feel free to contact us!

Difficult Devices - Part I

Difficult Devices - Part I

Forensic matters pose a variety of challenges. Sometimes potentially important data has been deleted; sometimes the cost of labour is restrictive, and all too often, the deadline by which processing and analysis must be completed is extremely tight. There are a myriad of solutions for these issues, but what do you do when the device itself is the thing that’s making the case so difficult?

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Naughty v. Nice: Santa Adopts Trending Tech - Part 2

Naughty v. Nice: Santa Adopts Trending Tech - Part 2

Just when we thought we’d hammered out a practical and scalable approach, an Elf named Sugar Toes raised a thorny problem: namely, the fakers. You know the ones: those kids who act nice, especially when adults are watching, but who actually are not nice at all while interacting with others on social media. It seems that Sugar Toes had done a spot check of the Nice List, cross-referencing the children’s Twitter and Facebook accounts, and what he’d uncovered was concerning. The Nice List was full of cyber bullies, haters, and internet trolls (not to be confused with Christmas trolls, who steal candy). There were even instances in which children had posted bathroom selfies.

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Naughty v. Nice: Santa Adopts Trending Tech

Naughty v. Nice: Santa Adopts Trending Tech

It’s that time of year again - the time when girls and boys all over the world start to behave a little better in hopes of getting on the list.  They go to bed on time, eat their vegetables without being told to, finish all their homework, and even treat their siblings nicely for a change. Not so long ago, these efforts would have done the trick, but this year, Santa is introducing a game changer, and naughty boys and girls had best be prepared.

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Altep San Francisco

Altep San Francisco

With offices throughout the United States and Europe, Altep staffs experts in a wide variety of fields, including litigation and law enforcement, information security, compliance, and ediscovery/edisclosure.

Each location brings its own unique experiences and specialties to the table; we talked to Eamonn Markham, Alteps' Regional Account Executive in San Francisco, to understand what makes the San Francisco office special.

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Next Generation Malware Demands Next Generation Endpoint Security

Next Generation Malware Demands Next Generation Endpoint Security

2015 was a watershed year for malware development. Not only did we see more unique malware than in any other year, we also witnessed a very clear shift in malware behavior: namely, a trend toward polymorphism.

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The eDiscovery Obstacle Course: A Survival Guide

The eDiscovery Obstacle Course: A Survival Guide

By Hunter McMahon and Sara Skeens

Surviving eDiscovery can be just like conquering an obstacle course race (OCR). It takes the right gear, experience, training, and attitude. As obstacle course enthusiasts and eDiscovery strategists alike will tell you, you don’t get to choose the course or the obstacles—they are given to you “as is.” Therefore, preparation and agility are key characteristics of a true OCRer.

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What is Continuous Active Learning (CAL), Really? – Part One

What is Continuous Active Learning (CAL), Really? – Part One

Ever since the March 2, 2015 Rio Tinto opinion and order, there has been a lot of buzz in eDiscovery around the phrase “Continuous Active Learning” (CAL). Judge Peck briefly mentioned CAL while summarizing the available case law around seed-set sharing and transparency. For the sake of clarity, the term seed-set in this post refers to the initial group of training documents used to kick off a Technology Assisted Review (TAR) project. We refer to the review sets that follow as training sets. The point of Judge Peck’s mention of CAL, as I understood it, was to alert readers to the possibility that seed-set selection and disclosure disputes may become much less necessary as TAR tools and protocols continue to evolve.

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Surviving Setbacks

Surviving Setbacks

I recently started getting back into training mode. I dusted off my road bike, my swim cap, and my running shoes to attempt a personal record on a triathlon I had done a few years ago. I mapped out a plan, prepared my training tools and started to push forward. My training included many techniques to help with the efficiency of my workouts and accommodate my busy schedule. My plan was clearly defined, running smoothly, and I was getting stronger and faster each day.

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Redefining Responsiveness Evaluation: Making the Case for True Unique Document Review

Redefining  Responsiveness Evaluation: Making the Case for True Unique Document Review

If you are reading this blog, you have probably heard the story many times by now. Document review is the most expensive part of eDiscovery. Like many, I find myself asking the same question again and again. How can we do it better? One obvious answer is by defensibly reviewing less. The not so obvious part of that answer is the available methods for doing so.

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Having a Game Plan

Having a Game Plan

Earlier this month I ran in the Spartan Super race in Asheville, NC (Black Mountain). After more than 2,000 feet in elevation gain and a rapid descent, spanning over 10 miles, overcoming 26 obstacles, pushing through 155 burpees…I was DONE! It was by far the hardest competition I’ve completed.

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Health Care Entities are the Hacker’s Gold Mine

Health Care Entities are the Hacker’s Gold Mine

There are many kinds of data that hackers find profitable, and any number of different targets, from retailers to universities, where that data can be found. However, one group of victims is by far the most popular among data thieves, not because they are necessarily the easiest to breach, but because the data they hold is more valuable.

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PCI vs. HIPAA: Comparing Standards and Penalties in the Wake of Recent Breaches

PCI vs. HIPAA: Comparing Standards and Penalties in the Wake of Recent Breaches

What has more value to you: your medical records or your financial data? At first glance, it would seem that an x-ray wouldn’t be worth as much as a debit card number – after all, one is just an image of the skeleton, but the other can be used to purchase practically anything, in person or online. However, the truth is that medical records often contain a great wealth of Personal Identifiable Information (PII) and Protected Health Information (PHI), including your first and last name, date of birth, physical address and - most importantly - your Social Security Number.

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You've Been Breached

You've Been Breached

You’ve Been Breached. Pay the sum of 950,50 Bitcoins, or else...

Has it happened to you yet? Take notice of the not-so-subtle “yet”. I’ve been fortunate to work with some of the best and brightest InfoSec people, as well as my own data forensics group, on incident response engagements (IR). It’s dizzying and quite chaotic until the teams are plugged in and making hurried sense of complex events. Who got in? How many times? What was the point of ingress? Bad firewall rules? Weak VPN passwords? Third-party software vulnerability?

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My Top Five Takeaways from The U.S. Tax Court’s Emphatic Affirmation of Predictive Coding

My Top Five Takeaways from The U.S. Tax Court’s Emphatic Affirmation of Predictive Coding

Dynamo Holdings Limited Partnership v. Commissioner

In an order dated July 13, 2016, the U.S. Tax Court once again strongly supported the use of Predictive Coding. The case had already featured some notable opinions and orders on the topic. This recent order is a fun read for analytics nerds and newcomers alike, as the Court did a great job of laying out the associated facts and addressing the typical arguments for and against use of the technology. Here are a few items that caught my attention as I read it.

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To SME or Not to SME (in TAR)… That is the Question

To SME or Not to SME (in TAR)… That is the Question

This article assumes that Technology Assisted Review is being deployed in a production review setting where the user seeks to identify potentially relevant documents from among a larger corpus, and to subject those documents to full manual review.  The use of TAR as an investigative or fact finding tool is a more financially flexible proposition, and the efficiency of that approach should be evaluated via separate standards.

There has been some debate in the past few years about the proper role of the Subject Matter Expert (SME) in technology assisted review (TAR) – a discussion which has understandably resulted in plenty of disagreement. There was a time when most blog posts and white papers swore that SME training was the only path to success, but that position looks to have softened some.

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Your Data is Everywhere - Deal With It

Your Data is Everywhere - Deal With It

I say this to colleagues all of the time: “People will trade privacy for convenience every step of the way.” My contemporaries nod reassuringly, perhaps in an attempt to hush my banter, though maybe they actually represent a large contingency of informed people who agree.

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Creative Analytics - Part 3: The Toolbox

Creative Analytics - Part 3: The Toolbox
This post is Part 3 of a series - you can also watch a video of the related webinar.
 
By Sara Skeens and Josh Tolles
Welcome to part three of our Creative Analytics series. Part one provided a suggested roadmap for getting more comfortable with analytics tools, and exploring more creative uses. In part two, we discussed some of the challenges common to the presentation phase of the EDRM, which require us to look for creative solutions. This brings us to part three – the solutions. In this post we will provide more detail on a few key tools and techniques that we deploy to overcome those common challenges. This final installment is intended to serve as the closing primer for our co-hosted webinar with kCura that will be taking place tomorrow, Wednesday July 13th - Leveraging Analytics for Depo & Trial Prep. Please tune in then where we will put things into a more visual, workflow-based perspective. 
 

 

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Creative Analytics - Part 2: The Presentation Phase

Creative Analytics - Part 2: The Presentation Phase

This post is Part 2 of a series - you can also watch a video of the related webinar, or read Part 1, on the kCura Blog.

 

By Joshua Tolles and  Sara Skeens

Solving Challenges in the Presentation Phase 

In our last post, we discussed the value of looking at analytics in e-Discovery with a creative mindset, and a few steps that you can take to expand your problem solving horizons. As we noted there, analytics is most commonly thought of as a tool to be applied during the review phase of the EDRM to control data sizes; however, we'd like to change that. At Altep, we frequently use analytics to solve many more problems than just those found in the production review arena. With a firm grasp on the technology, plenty of curiosity, and a healthy passion for "building a better mouse trap," we have found quite a few areas where analytics can help turn the eDiscovery rat race into a more methodical and scalable process. 

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Data with Purpose

​This past Spring I splurged and bought the Garmin Fenix 3. The thought was that if I better understood how I was training, I could elevate my efforts and become more effective in planning my workouts. I may not be a professional athlete like Hunter McIntyre or Ryan Atkins, but with limited hours in the day I need to make sure my time is spent as e...
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And Then There Were Twenty-Seven… Now What? Untangling Uncertainty in the UK Exit from the EU

STOP.​The United Kingdom has not left the European Union. This endeavour will be painfully drawn out and will take anywhere from two to four years for it to be done and dusted –the exit that is. In a decent technology analogy, this will be a bit like yanking the single power lead from a tangled mess of surge protector madness beneath your feet.&nbs...
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Location, Location, Location

Recently relocated from Southern California to Atlanta, Georgia, I have been reminded how much climates and conditions can vary from one region to the next. In this particular instance, there was very little change in elevation, but the difference in humidity would leave most gasping for air after their first three mile trail run. Most afternoons s...
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No Quick "Brexit"

In or out –that's the question facing citizens of Britain come Thursday, 23 June 2016. Britain has been a member-country (one of 28 to date) since 1973, and if they move to secede from the European Union, the economic and political fallout are likely to be significant. At present time, research groups and economic powers are releasing studies in an...
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Focused Agility

​A coach once told me that "focus is like a spotlight." You may miss what you are searching for if the beam of your spotlight is too broad, because you've reduced its effectiveness. However, by focusing the spotlight and therefore the brightness on a more refined area, you have a greater chance of seeing and finding what you are seeking. The coach ...
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Introduction To ESI and Obstacle Course Racing

​Like some 4.5 million other Americans, in 2015 I was bitten by the Obstacle Course Racing (OCR) bug. Unlike mosquito bites that itch for a while and then go away, the OCR bite just keeps on itching. Last year I completed three Spartan Races (SoCal Sprint, Seattle Super, and Los Angeles Sprint) as well as two Rugged Maniacs (SoCal and Atlanta). And...
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The Hack That Always Works

​Confidence schemes, or "con games," are as old and varied as mankind. For centuries, con artists have relied upon simple, direct forms of communication, gaining their victims' trust through one-on-one conversations, letters, simple demonstrations, and the like. Unfortunately, the advent of technology has led to a revolution in dishonesty, offering...
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